Category Archives: Calls for Papers: Conferences

CFP: RETHINKING CHILD AND YOUTH MARGINALITIES: MOVEMENTS, NARRATIVES, AND EXCHANGES

CFP: RETHINKING CHILD AND YOUTH MARGINALITIES: MOVEMENTS, NARRATIVES, AND EXCHANGES

Anthropology of Childhood and Youth Interest Group (ACYIG) Biennial Conference

March 7-9, 2019 

Rutgers University—Camden, NJ

Co-Sponsored by: AAA Anthropology of Children and Youth Interest Group, Department of Childhood Studies (Rutgers-Camden), Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice (Rutgers-Camden), and The Graduate School (Rutgers-Camden) 

In a world centered on adults, ‘childhood’ as a social category is marginal. Such marginality makes complex tracks on child and youth bodies, psyches, relationships, and spaces. Existing research on children and youth has expanded our understanding beyond a binary and static reading of their lives by framing the multiple sources of marginality as active sociocultural processes that are embedded in—but are not overdetermined by—enduring effects like structural violence, capitalism, racism, homophobia, and nationalism. This scholarship compels us to pay attention to the movements, narratives, and exchanges that mark these processes of making, breaking, and negotiating marginalities.  This conference aims to rethink child and youth marginalities in generative and creative ways that situate young people at the center, and that resist their dehumanization, whether through criminalization or romanticization.

Continue reading CFP: RETHINKING CHILD AND YOUTH MARGINALITIES: MOVEMENTS, NARRATIVES, AND EXCHANGES

Theorising young people’s aspirations in a global context: an interdisciplinary conference

Taking place  on Monday 26th and Tuesday 27th March 2018 in the Hamilton Centre, Brunel University London

This interdisciplinary 2 day conference aims to advance conceptual understanding of how young people form, experience and deploy aspiration; the global institutions and processes that shape young people’s aspirations; and the outcomes of aspiration for young people and for wider society. Recent empirical research from diverse contexts worldwide has reported on the expressed desires of young people to ‘become someone’. Meanwhile, global institutions and national governments represent aspiration as a key to understanding inequality and a motivating force that can inspire social change. Aspiration is understood to play a key role in shaping young people’s engagement with education, politics and migration. Yet despite the burgeoning attention to aspiration in both research and policy, its theorisation remains relatively neglected.

Key note speakers

Professor Jo Boyden, University of Oxford

Professor Sam Punch, University of Stirling

A full programme will be sent to attendees before the conference takes place. In the meantime registration has opened and you can sign up here: Theorising-aspirations

The price of tickets are as follows; £30 for unwaged attendee ,

£50 for waged attendees

For further information please contact  [email protected]

CFP: Children, Youth, and Performance Conference: Connecting Drama and Performance Research to Practice in the Lives of Young People

Toronto, June 24th, 2018. Proposal deadline February 9th, 2018.

Building on the Ada Slaight Education Centre’s strong focus on Theatre for Young Audiences and Drama-in-Education, the ‘Children, Youth, and Performance Conference’ will bring together scholars, performers, and practitioners from different areas of the world. This conference is intended to be an exchange of knowledge, research innovations, and practical methods, examining the future applications and implications of performance work with, by, for, and about children and youth. This peer-reviewed conference will put performance research to work and discuss its effects on the lives of young people.

Proposals

We welcome proposals based on cutting-edge research, theories, and practices which focus on any of these five streams:

1. Drama, Justice, and Advocacy

2. Theatre by and for Young People

3. Global Perspectives on Children, Youth, and Performance

4. New Directions for Drama-in-Education

5. Youth Performance Across Disciplines

Each proposal should outline the presentation’s purpose, method, findings (for case studies and panels), and what will take place during the session. Please clearly indicate which conference stream your proposal best fits into, and which of the following formats your presentation will take:

Case Studies (15 minutes): These presentations should discuss case studies and projects relevant to one of the above conference themes. We welcome interactive, innovative presentation approaches, veering away from traditional ‘lecture-style’ paper presentations.

‘On-Your-Feet’ Workshops (45 minutes): Workshops should be directly relevant to one of the conference themes, and welcoming to participants with varying levels of performance or research experience. Please ensure your workshop carefully adheres to the allotted timeframe (including all required set-up and/or take-down), as sessions will be back-to-back. Workshop presenters are responsible for their own materials and set-up. Please clearly indicate space needs (empty room, chairs, tables, etc.), and the specific activities that will take place.

Panels (30 minutes): We welcome panel proposals of three to five participants, showcasing initiatives and projects relevant to one of the above conference streams. Panels may include any combination of researchers, practitioners, performers, and/or young people, in a collaborative, discussion-style format.

Original Performance Pieces (up to 15 minutes): All proposed performances must fit within the allotted timeframe (including all required set-up and/or take-down). These pieces or excerpts should be original works created with, by, for, or about children and/or youth. Performances should be flexible for a variety of potential spaces (such as a classroom or studio) and should indicate specific resource needs (chairs, tables, etc.).

Your proposal should be no longer than one page, clearly stating the presentation title (20 words max.), presenter name(s) and bio(s) (100 words max.), the appropriate conference stream, the presentation format (workshop, panel etc.), and summary (250 words max.). Proposals must be sent directly to Abigail Shabtay, Conference Chair at [email protected]youngpeoplestheatre.ca no later than February 9th, 2018 at 4pm EST. Inquiries about facilities/accessibility can be directed to Karen Gilodo, Associate Artistic Director, at [email protected]. Accepted presenters must register and confirm attendance by the registration deadline to be included in the program schedule (registration details will follow letters of acceptance).

CfA: Youth on the Move: Reframing and Representing Youth Migration, South Africa, April 2018

The Anthropology of Children and Youth is thrilled to co-sponsor Youth on the Move: Reframing and Representing Youth Migration, an interdisciplinary conference at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. On April 11, 2018, we will hold a workshop for emerging scholars and on April 13, 2018, we will hold an international conference. Please see the CFP for additional details. The application deadline is January 31st.

CfP—Migrant Illegality across Uneven Legal Geographies: A Two-Part Convening

University of Colorado-Denver, April 6-7, 2018 and Brown University, October 26-27, 2018

Given the current political climate, there is a crucial need to examine how illegality is experienced across geographic contexts for undocumented immigrant communities. According to Hiemstra (2010), “labeling a person ‘illegal’ is a subtle yet powerful tool for creating, marking and magnifying perceived difference and exclusion” (p. 78). While the federal political and legal landscape is characterized both by enforcement through a record number of deportations andinaction on comprehensive immigration reform, states and localities have also begun to engage in their own vastly different immigration policy making and enforcement (Zuniga and Hernandez-Leon, 2005; Martos, 2010; Varsanyi, 2010; Varsanyi and Provine, 2012). Some localities have expanded rights for undocumented immigrants, as is the case in states like California and Illinois, both of which are traditional immigrant gateways. While others have become much more restrictionist, as is the case in places such as Tennessee and Georgia, which are considered new immigrant destinations.

Continue reading CfP—Migrant Illegality across Uneven Legal Geographies: A Two-Part Convening

CfP — Latin American Studies Association 2018 in Barcelona, May 23-26, 2018

Panel organizers: Fina Carpena-Méndez (Oregon State University)
Aleksandra Wierucka (University of Gdansk)

Youth making and unmaking hope in Latin America’s New Ruralities and beyond

Climate chaos, ecological disasters, failed rural livelihoods promoted by neoliberal models of development, exclusionary and authoritarian politics are the conditions in which peasant and indigenous youth in Latin America give meaning to their daily experiences and shape their life trajectories. Both schools and migration that were imagined as sources of hope have often had contradictory roles or failed to deliver on their promises for a better future for rural populations. Facing Euro-American modernity’s imperative of severing the threads of tradition and the constant emergence of new forms of practice and knowing, we explore ethnographic work on peasant and indigenous youth’s struggles to produce spaces of hope through the active generation of alternatives to a consumer-dependent society, new livelihood strategies, sustaining inter-generational relations and cultural identities, migration, social justice advocacy and beyond.

Please send abstracts to Fina Carpena-Méndez ([email protected]) and Aleksandra Wierucka (aleksandra.wierucka[email protected]) by August 25th 2017.

https://lasa.international.pitt.edu/eng/congress/

CfP—Playing with Childhood in the Twenty-First Century, University of Pittsburgh, April 6-7, 2018

Download pdf announcement.

The past decade has witnessed an array of new forms of public and global interest in marginalized children, whether the incredible rise in the visibility of lesbian, gay, and transgender children, the international migrations of refugee children from Latin America and the Syrian conflict, or the over-incarceration and detention in the United States of undocumented and African American children. In a moment when the marginality of childhood and the child’s function as a signal of futurity are being refigured by these global and historical events, this conference seeks papers that reach across the many disciplines that study children to produce new ways of thinking that make sense of and respond to the complexity of their lives.

This two-day conference hosted by the Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies Program, the Children’s Literature and Childhood Studies Program, and the Humanities Center at the University of Pittsburgh will explore how to conceptualize, theorize, and approach research on children and childhood in the rapidly changing context of the twenty-first century. Affirming a conceptual and methodological “play” across fields, a mode of intellectual curiosity and unsettling of boundaries, we invite participants to reimagine the place of the child and childhood in their home discipline, and to reimagine their home discipline through the figure of the child and childhood. There will also be several meet the author book panels featuring scholars with recent monographs on children and childhood. Continue reading CfP—Playing with Childhood in the Twenty-First Century, University of Pittsburgh, April 6-7, 2018

CfP – One Child, Many Hands: A Multidisciplinary Conference on Child Welfare

Download the OCMH Conference flyer announcement for full details.
Call for papers deadline: January 15, 2017

One Child, Many Hands: A Multidisciplinary Conference on Child Welfare is a multidisciplinary conference geared for child welfare practitioners, policy makers and administrators alike. The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia is serving as Lead Community Sponsor of the conference, to be held at the beautiful and historic University of Pennsylvania Law School.

Opening the conference is acclaimed author, professor, and foster parent, Cris Beam. Cris’ book, To the End of June: The Intimate Life of American Foster Care, was named a New York Times Notable Book in 2013 and is a must-read for those working in the child welfare system.

In keeping with this year’s theme of Transcending Adversity, closing the conference will be Dr. Robert Anda, co-principal investigator and co-founder of the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study (ACEs) for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This groundbreaking 17,000 patient study tracked the effects of child abuse and childhood trauma on health throughout the lifespan, and is clearly one of the most influential pieces of research of our time.

Obtain further details of the conference online.