Call for Chapters for an Edited Volume: Kids in Cages: The History, Politics, and Lived Experiences of Child Migrant Detention

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to invite you to submit a chapter proposal for an edited volume tentatively titled Kids in Cages: The History, Politics, and Lived Experiences of Child Migrant Detention (see description below). Should you be interested in participating, please send a title, abstract, and author bio by August 1, 2021. Should the abstract be accepted, we would notify you by mid-August and would expecting to receive drafts for review by November 1, 2021 and finalized chapters byJanuary 15, 2022. The expectation is that the project will be published with NYU Press, who has shown considerable interest in the volume.

The detainment of migrant children has recently become well-documented in news media, with viral images of “kids in cages” being attributed to the Trump administration. However, the migration of children to the United States is not new, nor is their detainment. In this volume, we seek to provide greater context to the history and current realities of child migrant detention.

The “surge” of children migrating alone since 2012 became a reminder of our precarious understanding of this population in the social, legal, and political immigration discourse of the United States. It also became clear that our social, legal, and political remedies are vastly inadequate at best and cruel at worst. When and how did the detention of immigrant children become the norm? What has been the evolution of legal remedies and its connection to American politics? What has been the impact on immigrant families in the United States that endured the detention and forced separation from their children? Who profits and how much has the detention of children increased? What has been the response of the American public to the detention of immigrant children over the decades?

In this volume, we will bring together interdisciplinary work that explores the practice of detaining migrant children. We hope to address the longer history of child migration to the United States, with a particular focus on the government interventions throughout the decades. We would like to include insight into the political and activist battles surrounding child migrant detention. Finally, this volume seeks to provide accounts of the impact of detention on children, their families, and their communities.

Topics may include, but are not limited to: Child migration history, law, and policy; Emergence of the unaccompanied minor in American immigration; Historical accounts of child migrant detention; Psychological and developmental impacts of detention on children and families; Political battles over child migration detention; Ethnographic or narrative accounts of child migrant detention; Activism around child detention; Analysis of the Flores settlement and other policy; Detention as violence; Criminalization of migrant children in and through detention; Media representations of child migrant detention; Ethics of detention; Experience of practitioners working with detained children; Analysis of nonprofit and for-profit detention structures.

Manuscripts should not be previously published.

Please submit inquiries and abstracts for consideration to Emily Ruehs-Navarro, PhD (emily.navarro@elmhurst.edu) and Lina Munoz-Caswell (lcaswell@ccm.edu) by August 1, 2021.

Seeking Chapter Submissions for COVID Play Academic Volume

Two folklorists will be editing a multidisciplinary academic volume on COVID Play and are seeking submissions for chapters. We are particularly interested in a range of cultural voices that address the play of children, youth, or adults in a variety of countries during the pandemic. Topics of interest include: resilience, creativity, and resourcefulness in play during this time, COVID related themes in play, use of public playgrounds and public spaces during the pandemic, and creative uses of online play and techno mischief.  Send expressions of interest to Dr. Anna Beresin aberesin@uarts.edu, and Dr. Julia Bishop j.c.bishop@sheffield.ac.uk

Dr. Anna Beresin is professor of psychology and folklore in critical studies at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the US. She serves as co-editor of the International Journal of Play.

Dr. Julia Bishop is research associate in the School of Education at the University of Sheffield in the UK where she studies children’s folklore, past and present. She is on the editorial board of the International Journal of Play.

Upcoming talk by Dr. Amy Brainer April 23rd, 12pm (EST)

Intimate harm, intimate healing: Thinking more globally and intersectionally about queer youth and Covid-19

 

Impacts of Covid-19 on queer youth have been profound. We must think about these impacts in ways that are locally rooted and global in scope, as the pandemic itself has been. This talk will concentrate on three areas where harm has occurred: carceral and immigration systems; loss of basic material security; and the family as a site of care and oppression that is underserved by current models of activism. These are a small number of the many areas that require attention and healing. Thus, the talk will move quickly from presentation to dialogue so that other participants can share their work and insights.

 

Bio: Amy Brainer is associate professor of Women’s and Gender Studies and coordinator of LGBTQ+ Studies at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. She is the author Queer Kinship and Family Change in Taiwan, for which she received the Ruth Benedict Book Prize from the Association for Queer Anthropology. Her current research follows queer and trans individuals and couples as they navigate marriage-based immigration to Taiwan and the United States.

Register in advance for this meeting:
https://umich.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJAof-muqTovE9xaf1pxFDp3flhOtsiipOCP

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Please feel free to share the talk
with others who may be interested.

New Book Announcement: Experiencing the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Children, Peace Communication and Socialization

Dear Colleagues:

I’d like to share word of my new book: Warshel, Y. (2021). Experiencing the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Children, Peace Communication and Socialization. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

You can find links below for book review copies, course inspection and purchase copies, and a description of the book below those.

The book is divided into 4 parts. If you are interested in adopting for a course, dependent on your focus, you can use one or all. The first part of the book describes the production of peacebuilding versions of Israeli and Palestinian Sesame Street; the second, the reception of it by Palestinian, Jewish Israeli and Arab/Palestinian Israeli citizens in-the-making; the third, an ethnography of violence of these young audience members conflict zones lives, illuminating why they interpreted the glocal hybrid television programs the way they did; and the fourth, offering recommendations to peace media practitioners interested in applying evidence to their practice. Part IV ties together the introduction, aimed at advancing a subdiscipline of peace communication, to provide scholars with methodological recommendations to critically and empirically determine the utility using media to build, make, and sustain peace in contexts of armed political conflicts.

While focused on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the book is framed both comparatively and globally so applicable to and includes recommendations for using communication to manage conflict worldwide and address debates surrounding structural discrimination and social justice.

A TEDx talk I gave summarizes the book and can be used together with chapters as a standalone course module for teaching (including for those in need of an asynchronous online module): https://www.ted.com/talks/yael_warshel_a_call_for_evidence_can_media_help_build_make_and_sustain_peace

purchase copies: https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/experiencing-the-israelipalestinian-conflict/696329534C17D1B0BA9243FE02A7D0C8

review copies: https://www.cambridge.org/gb/academic/request-review-copy

inspection copies: https://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/textbooks/inspection-copy-information

Book Description:

“Over the last eighty years there has been a global rise in ‘peace communication’ practice, the use of interpersonal and mass communication interventions to mediate between peoples engaged in political conflict. In this study, Yael Warshel analyses Israeli and Palestinian versions of Sesame Street which targeted negative inter-group attitudes and stereotypes. Merging communication, peace and conflict studies, social psychology, anthropology, political science, education, Middle Eastern and childhood studies, this book provides a template to think about how audiences receive, interpret, use and are influenced by peace communication. By picking apart the text and subtext of the kind of media these specific audiences of children consume, Warshel examines how they interpret ‘peace communication’ interventions, are socialised into Palestinians, Jewish Israelis and Arab/Palestinian Israelis, political opinions they express, and violence they reproduce. She questions whether peace communication practices have any relevant structural impact on their audiences, why such interventions fail, and offers recommendations for improving future communication interventions into political conflict worldwide.”

Best,

Yael Warshel
Pennsylvania State University

Anthropology of Childhood and Youth Interest Group (ACYIG) Statement of Solidarity and Action

The Anthropology of Childhood and Youth Interest Group, part of the American Anthropological Association, condemns the murders of Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd, Tony McDade, and all of the many Black individuals violently killed. We stand with and point to the Association of Black Anthropologists’ statement against police violence and anti-Black racism.  As scholars of childhood and youth, we know that racism does untold violence to child and youth lives. As a predominantly white subdiscipline, in a discipline that has been shaped and intimately intertwined with whiteness and colonialism, we also acknowledge our current and historical complicity in Black oppression.

This statement is delayed because we have taken some time to think about what we can concretely do as an organization. We both call for comprehensive equity in the treatment of Black children and youth and commit ourselves to learn more about anti-Black racism and racial disparities in our discipline. Specifically, we commit to:

An Inclusive syllabus project and pedagogy.  Our hope is that through citing and deeply engaging with Black authors and Black communities who are too often silenced, we can help foster coalitional empathy among students and provide space in our classrooms for addressing oppression-based trauma (e.g., trauma from xenophobia, forced displacement, anti-Black racism, etc.) and combatting racial violence in all forms. We will compile suggestions of inclusive syllabi focused on the study of childhood and post these on our website.

A commitment to publishing from NEOS.  At NEOS, we stand in unequivocal solidarity with Black colleagues, students,  practitioners, and communities.  We commit to using NEOS as a platform to center issues of racial (in)justices in the lives of children and youth and to amplify the voices of scholars of color. In our commitment to equity in action, the October 2020 Issue of NEOS will be dedicated to exploring the intersections of childhood and health and we will prioritize submissions that attend to issues of racism and inequities in health, healthcare, and well-being. We also commit to the creation of a new standing column in NEOS dedicated to racial equity and the dismantling of white supremacy, which will be catalyzed by an April 2021 Special Issue on anti-Black racism, racial brutality, and the unapologetic pursuit of justice.

Recruitment and representation.  We will actively recruit BIPOC board members, as well as presenters in invited sessions and conferences. We are also planning on a number of keynote talks next year, and we are making a concerted effort to address some of the disparities in our field in these public gatherings.

Reflexive Introspection and Analysis. We will set up a committee to examine and report on equity and racism within the study of childhood itself, with suggestions for what we as an organization can do to address these issues.

 

Join the ACYIG Team as Convenor-Elect

We are looking to fill a new ACYIG board member position-Convenor Elect. The Convenor-Elects responsibilities are to attend board and business meetings for a year, shadow the convenor, and help the convenor with tasks as needed. After that year, the convenor-elect will transition to a two-year term as convenor. The Convenor Elect position will begin on July 1, 2020.
If you are interested in this position, please e-mail your CV as well as one to two paragraphs to Elise Berman (eberman@uncc.edu) stating why you would like to become convenor-elect and what you think you can bring to the position. Please be sure to include your name, title, affiliation (academic or otherwise) and email/phone number so that we can respond to you.
If you have any questions about ACYIG committee member duties or the open appointment process, please do not hesitate to contact us. We are happy to answer any questions.

Full-time, Tenure-track Special Collections Librarian, Arne Nixon Center at CSU, Fresno

California State University, Fresno
Henry Madden Library
Assistant/Associate Librarian
Anticipated starting salary: $86,000 annually

The Henry Madden Library seeks a highly motivated, creative and forward-thinking Special Collections Librarian for the Arne Nixon Center for the Study of Children’s Literature, who will curate the collection and bring it to its full potential as a research collection. This is a full-time, tenure-track librarian faculty position. The successful candidate will collaborate with teaching faculty from multiple disciplines (for example, Art and Design, Art history, English, Creative Writing, and History) to develop high-impact classroom practices and library instruction sessions that advance the University’s goal of excellence in teaching, learning and innovation. Experience with applications to textual analysis, creative writing, illustration, and the history of children’s literature (especially as it relates to racial and ethnic diversity, foreign language materials, LGBTQ+ issues and social justice) is highly desirable. The ANC Librarian serves as an ambassador from the Library to the University and the larger community, finding a balance between the academic purpose of the ANC while using its collections and programs to build relationships in the community to support and expand the Center. The ANC Librarian is an active participant in the shared governance of the library and in the academic life of campus. The successful candidate will be a fully integrated member of the library faculty and will be expected to meet all of the requirements for retention, tenure and promotion, including service to the campus and the community. Tenure-track librarians receive an official probationary plan, mentoring and funding. Specific assignments are dependent on departmental needs and the background of the individual.

Qualifications:
Required Education (from an accredited institution or foreign equivalent.):
1. An earned M.I.L.S (or equivalent) from an American Library Association-accredited institution or program recognized by the American Library Association as an international equivalent.

Required Experience

  1. Three to five years professional experience as a special collections librarian.
  2. Minimum of one year of professional experience providing research, reference and instruction support in an academic or research environment.
  3. Minimum of one year of professional experience managing the daily activities of a unit or department.
  4. Minimum of two years of successful supervisory experience.
  5. Demonstrated curatorial, organizational and planning skills with excellent attention to detail.
  6. Demonstrated ability to work effectively, both independently and in cooperation with faculty, staff, and students from diverse racial, ethnic, cultural, and socioeconomic backgrounds regardless of age, gender, marital status, religion, sexual orientation or disabilities.
  7. Excellent verbal and written communication skills.

Preferred Experience

  1. Demonstrated understanding of children’s literature research and research trends in the field.
  2. Demonstrated facility and successful experience with current and emerging technology as it applies to collection management, outreach, and instruction.
  3. Experience creating or maintaining a collection development policy for a multifaceted collection.
  4. Experience working with digital collections.
  5. Experience with overseeing, planning and preparing department or collection budgets.
  6. Experience in developing working partnerships with diverse academic departments and campus units and organizations.
  7. Demonstrated ability to build community relationships and increase support for the Center.
  8. Experience with planning, organizing and executing successful events.
  9. Experience designing and setting up exhibits.
  10. Experience with grants and private fundraising.
  11. Experience with working with an advisory board or friends group.
  12. Experience with copyright issues and advanced research assistance.
  13. Excellent presentation skills.
  14. Experience with assessment tools and methods.
  15. Foreign language ability.

Application Procedures
For best consideration, apply by May 25, 2020.  This position vacancy remains open until filled.  Apply online at http://jobs.csufresno.edu and attach the following:

  1. Letter of interest or cover letter specifically addressing all elements of required experience. Please also address any of the preferred qualifications you may have.
  2. Current curriculum vitae.
  3. Names and contact information of three professional references
  4. Statement addressing your commitment to working with faculty, staff, and students from diverse racial, ethnic, cultural, and socioeconomic backgrounds.
  5. Philosophy on community engagement and donor relations.
  6. List of past publications or professional creative activities or a statement of research interests and potential publications, projects or presentations.

Candidates invited for an on-campus visit must submit by mail/e-mail within the designated deadline. The Search Chair will send information and requests for these items.

  1. Three current letters of recommendation (dated within 12 months of full consideration date.)
  2. Official transcripts.

Committee Information
Search Chair: Tammy Lau
Henry Madden Library
Email: tammyl@csufresno.edu

For full job vacancy announcement, please visit:  https://careers.fresnostate.edu/en-us/job/496720/special-collections-librarian-for-the-arne-nixon-center

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