NEOS Current Issue Volume 12: Issue 2

 

 

NEOS is the flagship publication of the Anthropology of Children and Youth Interest Group (ACYIG) of the American Anthropological Association. All articles within this bi-annual, refereed publication are open access. The current issue can be downloaded in its entirety in PDF format.

Table of Contents

Editor’s Corner

Editorial: Health & Well-Being in Uncertain Times: Centering Children & Youth

ACYIG Advisory Board Update

NEOS Welcomes and Farewells

CFP for Spring 2021 Issue: In Pursuit of Racial Justice in Child & Youth Studies  

Commentaries

The City at Small Scale: Children’s Urban Play in a Global Pandemic

Medical Anthropology and Pediatric Healthcare in the Age of COVID-19

Parents, Infants, and COVID-19: A Critical Autoethnographic Commentary

Original Research Articles

Disjuncture as Well-Being in Youth Swimming: The Effects of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Everyday Associations and Routines

“We Are Not Robots”: The Stakes of Care in Times of Uncertainty

Children’s Accommodations for Resilience in Uncertain Times

Health Care Accessibility Beyond Social Services: Considerations for Aging Out

Centering Voices of Sexual and Gender Minority Youth: The Urgent Need to Adapt Outreach Techniques

Anxiety and the Politics of Child Well-Being During COVID-19

The Critical State of Indigenous Australian Children’s Health and Well-Being in 2020

Kin-Care and Well-Being for Children and Youth in Cameroon’s Intersecting Uncertainties

About Us

About NEOS

Anthropology of Children and Youth Interest Group (ACYIG)

NEOS Editorial Board

NEOS Author Biographies


Editor’s Corner

Editorial: Health & Well-Being in Uncertain Times: Centering Children & Youth

Courtney L. Everson, PhD (Colorado State University)
María V. Barbero, PhD (Florida Gulf Coast University)
NEOS Co-Editors
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ACYIG Advisory Board Update
Dori Beeler, PhD
University of Maryland Baltimore, ACYIG Communications Chair
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NEOS Welcomes and Farewells
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CFP for Spring 2021 Issue: In the Pursuit of Racial Justice in Child & Youth Studies  
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Commentaries

The City at Small Scale: Children’s Urban Play in a Global Pandemic
Margie Sanderson
Society for Children and Youth of BC
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Medical Anthropology and Pediatric Healthcare in the Age of COVID-19
Sarah Elizabeth Morrow, M.A.
UPMC Health Plan/University of Alabama
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Parents, Infants, and COVID-19: A Critical Autoethnographic Commentary
Elisha Oliver, PhD
Oklahoma State University
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Original Research Articles

Disjuncture as Well-Being in Youth Swimming: The Effects of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Everyday Associations and Routines
Sean Heath, M.A.
University of Brighton
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“We Are Not Robots”: The Stakes of Care in Times of Uncertainty
Jieun Cho
Duke University
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Children’s Accommodations for Resilience in Uncertain Times
Julie Spray, PhD
Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis
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Health Care Accessibility Beyond Social Services: Considerations for Aging Out
EB Saldaña, M.A.
Princeton University
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Centering Voices of Sexual and Gender Minority Youth: The Urgent Need to Adapt Outreach Techniques

Lara Gunderson, PhD and Daniel Shattuck, PhD
Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation
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Anxiety and the Politics of Child Well-Being During COVID-19
Kimberly Fernandes, M.Ed. and Rabani Garg, MS.Ed.
University of Pennsylvania
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The Critical State of Indigenous Australian Children’s Health and Well-Being in 2020
Sheila Collingwood-Whittick, PhD
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Kin-Care and Well-Being for Children and Youth in Cameroon’s Intersecting Uncertainties
Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg, PhD
Carleton College
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About Us

About NEOS

NEOS is the flagship publication of the Anthropology of Children and Youth Interest Group (ACYIG), American Anthropological Association. The bi-annual publication consists of peer-reviewed original short-form research articles as well as editor-reviewed commentaries and feature pieces.  NEOS relies on the work of many volunteers, including the full editorial board, peer reviewers, the ACYIG communications team, and a multitude of advisory board members for both NEOS and ACYIG. If you are interested in getting involved, please contact [email protected] 


About ACYIG

Launched in 2007 as an Interest Group within the American Anthropological Association, the Anthropology of Children and Youth Interest Group (ACYIG) now boasts more than 1200 members in over ten countries. Members include academics and practitioners who publish on and work with, children all over the world. The need for an anthropological interest group concerned with children and childhood continues to center on the fact that, despite growing interest in the area of cross-cultural research on childhood, children’s experiences, and children’s rights, there are very few established places to discuss and publicize such work, especially outside the realm of education and health disciplines. 


Editorial Board

Co-Editor – Courtney L. Everson, PhD
Courtney L. Everson, PhD, is an applied medical anthropologist working at the intersection of public health, prevention sciences, and social work. Dr. Everson applies biosocial health frameworks and community-based approaches to study and uplift maternal-infant health, child well-being, child maltreatment prevention, positive youth development, and family strengthening. Dr. Everson is currently appointed as the Associate Director of the Social Work Research Center (SWRC), School of Social Work, College of Health and Human Sciences, at Colorado State University (CSU). At CSU/SWRC, she engages in team-based science and research-practice partnerships to advance equity-oriented transformations in the child welfare, juvenile justice, perinatal health, and behavioral health landscapes.

In addition to being the Co-Editor of NEOS, Dr. Everson serves as a Research Working Group member of the Academic Collaborative for Integrative Health; an Editorial Board member for the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine; Co-Chair of the Family Voice & Choice Committee for the Colorado Collaborative Management Program (CMP); and a strategic consultant to higher education entities, governmental agencies, and non-profit organizations on issues of equity, complex systems development, and anti-oppressive practices.

Dr. Everson holds a PhD in applied medical anthropology from Oregon State University with doctoral-level minors in public health and women, gender, and sexuality studies. She is also experienced in community midwifery; serves growing families as a birth doula, postpartum doula, and perinatal health educator; and advances community connection and well-being as a barre fitness instructor.

Co-Editor – Maria V. Barbero, PhD
Maria V. Barbero, PhD is an Assistant Professor of Integrated Studies at Florida Gulf Coast University. She has a PhD in Global and Sociocultural Studies from Florida International University an M.A. in Comparative Studies from The Ohio State University. Maria is currently working on a book manuscript on south-south youth migration to Buenos Aires, Argentina. Her work on migration, nationalism & youth, has been published in journals such as Citizenship Studies, Race and Ethnic Studies, and the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies. Maria’s research focuses on the migration-security nexus and how it impacts migrant populations in the Americas. She is particularly interested in the experiences of young people who straddle elusive boundaries between childhood and adulthood and how they experience state practices, discourses, and policies of protection and control.

Assistant Editor – Matilda Stubbs, PhD
Matilda Stubbs’ primary research focuses on the anthropology of social service administration, specifically the role of documents and bureaucratic culture in U.S. child welfare, adoption, and foster care services. She also teaches on a range of other topics including automobility and vehicularity, visual and material culture, communication, tourism, and sensory studies. Her most recent project focuses on the global political economy of youth slime culture and ASMR on social media platforms.

Assistant Editor – Alexea Howard, MA
Alexea Howard, MA is a recent graduate from California State University, Long Beach whose focus is in Medical Anthropology. She graduated at the top of her class with awards such as Distinguished Graduate Student, Academic Excellence, and Best Thesis. Alexea earned her BA (Honors) in Anthropology with a focus in Medical and Psychological Anthropology from the University of California, Los Angeles and received post-baccalaureate training in Psychology and Addiction Studies. Her research explores the way that concepts of health and illness are impacted by a sense of community and a gained sense of agency. Her most recent work focuses on reasons for continued use among those who participate and frequent pro-anorexia websites and how the use of these sites has impacted the community’s conceptions of health and illness as it relates to anorexia.

Assistant Editor – Kimberly Garza, MA, MPH
Kim is a PhD Candidate in Biological Anthropology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Her research takes a biocultural approach to how daily social interactions influence levels of stress and health status in adolescent girls. Working with middle school girls in the American South, she examines girls’ use of social interactions through ethnography and the use of biomarkers to better define the ways girls use social interactions to define status and social hierarchies within middle school and how they use these interactions to best navigate a complex social environment – and how these interactions may directly contribute to negative health outcomes. Kim has an MA in Anthropology and an MPH from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Digital Scholarship Intern – Delaney J. Glass
Delaney J. Glass is a Ph.D. student in Biological Anthropology at The University of Washington in Seattle. Her research area is at the intersection of human biology, evolutionary anthropology, and cultural anthropology. Her current work aims to understand how physical and social stressors are embodied (with impacts to Darwinian fitness and health) during adolescence and how this relates to cultural niche construction. She is currently a Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellow in the Middle East Center at UW, a trainee at the Center for Studies in Demography & Ecology and has recently joined the Advancing Arab American Health Network & Allies Research Group. She is pursuing training in qualitative and quantitative methods and is passionate about rstats and applying skills from Data Science to social science research.


Current Author Biographies

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