CFP: Children, Youth, and Performance Conference: Connecting Drama and Performance Research to Practice in the Lives of Young People

Toronto, June 24th, 2018. Proposal deadline February 9th, 2018.

Building on the Ada Slaight Education Centre’s strong focus on Theatre for Young Audiences and Drama-in-Education, the ‘Children, Youth, and Performance Conference’ will bring together scholars, performers, and practitioners from different areas of the world. This conference is intended to be an exchange of knowledge, research innovations, and practical methods, examining the future applications and implications of performance work with, by, for, and about children and youth. This peer-reviewed conference will put performance research to work and discuss its effects on the lives of young people.

Proposals

We welcome proposals based on cutting-edge research, theories, and practices which focus on any of these five streams:

1. Drama, Justice, and Advocacy

2. Theatre by and for Young People

3. Global Perspectives on Children, Youth, and Performance

4. New Directions for Drama-in-Education

5. Youth Performance Across Disciplines

Each proposal should outline the presentation’s purpose, method, findings (for case studies and panels), and what will take place during the session. Please clearly indicate which conference stream your proposal best fits into, and which of the following formats your presentation will take:

Case Studies (15 minutes): These presentations should discuss case studies and projects relevant to one of the above conference themes. We welcome interactive, innovative presentation approaches, veering away from traditional ‘lecture-style’ paper presentations.

‘On-Your-Feet’ Workshops (45 minutes): Workshops should be directly relevant to one of the conference themes, and welcoming to participants with varying levels of performance or research experience. Please ensure your workshop carefully adheres to the allotted timeframe (including all required set-up and/or take-down), as sessions will be back-to-back. Workshop presenters are responsible for their own materials and set-up. Please clearly indicate space needs (empty room, chairs, tables, etc.), and the specific activities that will take place.

Panels (30 minutes): We welcome panel proposals of three to five participants, showcasing initiatives and projects relevant to one of the above conference streams. Panels may include any combination of researchers, practitioners, performers, and/or young people, in a collaborative, discussion-style format.

Original Performance Pieces (up to 15 minutes): All proposed performances must fit within the allotted timeframe (including all required set-up and/or take-down). These pieces or excerpts should be original works created with, by, for, or about children and/or youth. Performances should be flexible for a variety of potential spaces (such as a classroom or studio) and should indicate specific resource needs (chairs, tables, etc.).

Your proposal should be no longer than one page, clearly stating the presentation title (20 words max.), presenter name(s) and bio(s) (100 words max.), the appropriate conference stream, the presentation format (workshop, panel etc.), and summary (250 words max.). Proposals must be sent directly to Abigail Shabtay, Conference Chair at [email protected]youngpeoplestheatre.ca no later than February 9th, 2018 at 4pm EST. Inquiries about facilities/accessibility can be directed to Karen Gilodo, Associate Artistic Director, at [email protected]. Accepted presenters must register and confirm attendance by the registration deadline to be included in the program schedule (registration details will follow letters of acceptance).

Responsibility and Adventure: Tongan Youth and Circular Migration

By Mary K. Good, Wake Forest University 
(Originally posted on January 2018: reposted here with permission from Youth Circulations)

Following the politically-driven riots in 2006, where looting and destruction of property was largely blamed on wayward youth, the nation of Tonga began to critically examine the emergent issue of youth unemployment and under-employment. The Tonga National Youth Congress and Tonga’s Ministry of Internal Affairs Division of Training, Employment, Youth, and Sports, along with several transnational non-governmental organizations and foreign government aid organizations, rolled out a variety of programs aimed at developing youth skills and offering pathways to employment. However, with about 60% of the population under the age of 25 (Tonga Census 2011), the numbers of youth seeking employment still outnumber available jobs, particularly on outer islands where fewer wage-earning opportunities exist. Thus, many youth and their families consider immigration to find work. Income from a temporary job overseas can sometimes exceed an entire year’s salary in Tonga. This economic incentive, coupled with a deeply engrained sense of moral responsibility to help one’s family and the prospect of an exciting adventure in the company of friends, leads many youth into circular migration—a pattern of movement that has become emblematic of life in parts of Tonga.

…read more on youthcirculations.com

 

Book Launch Event: Feminism and the Politics of Childhood: Friends or Foes?

We are pleased to announce the forthcoming release of Feminism and the Politics of Childhood: Friends or Foes?  (details attached)

To celebrate the launch of the book, we invite colleagues, friends, family and contributors to join us at the Institute of Advanced Studies (University College London) on the 7th March at 6pm. As well a brief overview of the book and an opportunity to hear from contributors, there will be wine and nibbles to enjoy!
Feminism and the Politics of Childhood: Friends or Foes?, edited by Rachel Rosen and Katherine Twamley, is a collection of 18 chapters which together offer an innovative and critical exploration of perceived commonalities and conflicts between women and children and, more broadly, intersections and antagonisms between various forms of feminism and the politics of childhood. This unique collection brings into dialogue authors from a wide variety of geographical contexts, academic disciplines, activist organisations, and theoretical perspectives. Together the contributions offer new ways to conceptualise relations between women and children and to address injustices faced by both groups.
Details and registration information for the launch are here: