All posts by ACYIG Web Manager

Humanity’s Surprising Variety of Approaches to Toilet Training

By Alma Gottlieb

(This work first appeared on SAPIENS under a CC BY-ND 4.0 license. Read the original here with photos. This article has also been published at The Conversation and has been republished under Creative Commons in Sapiens.)

Are 2-year-olds too young to start toilet training?

For many children, yes. Especially boys. At least, that’s what American pediatricians would likely say. Nowadays, only around half of children in the U.S. are fully toilet trained by age 3.

Chinese grandmothers would be appalled. They’d likely point out that with “split pants,” most kids are trained by age 2. This traditional wardrobe item features an opening along the crotch seam, allowing children to urinate and defecate freely without soiling their clothes. These garments remain the pants style of choice for toddlers living in the Chinese countryside.

Parenting advice about divergent toilet-training methods (not to mention plenty of other child-rearing questions) is typically dished out as if it were the only reasonable, reliable option. Nowadays, parents are confronted with guidance claimed to be scientifically founded, and presented as relevant to all children, even when different strategies are in direct conflict with each other. With over 2,000 parenting advice books in print in English—and, along with so many parenting blogs, there’s even a parody of the genre—it’s easy to see why many modern parents feel confused about how to raise their children.

As an anthropologist, I’ve been studying child-rearing practices around the world for 25 years. Living with my husband (writer Philip Graham) in small villages in the rainforest of West Africa for extended periods convinced me that we humans are a resilient species, able to thrive in so many distinctive settings. Discovering the incredible diversity of ways to raise children inspired us to rethink and change some of our own family’s child-rearing practices (around bed-sharing, independence, and household tasks, for instance).

There’s no one-size-fits-all model of child-rearing advice for all the world’s parents. To spread this message, my colleagues and I collaborated on the book A World of Babies: Imagined Childcare Guides for Eight Societies, based on our own and others’ long-term ethnographic fieldwork in places ranging from Israel and the Palestinian territories to China, Portugal, Peru, Denmark, Ivory Coast, and a Somali-American community in Minneapolis. By presenting multiple solutions to the commonest challenges facing parents, we hope to provide a bit of a tonic for parents, to assure them that there’s more than one path to raising a well-adjusted child.

Toilet training from birth?

So, why do parents choose a given child-rearing practice? Often, it comes down to money and availability. Let’s revisit that question about toilet training.

In Ivory Coast, Beng mothers begin training their infants’ bowels a few days after birth. They administer enemas twice daily, beginning the day a newborn’s dried-out umbilical cord stump drops off. By the time the little one is a few months old, caregivers shouldn’t have to worry about him pooping during the day at all.

What could account for such a seemingly extreme practice? For one thing, disposable diapers are unavailable in Beng villages—and throughout much of the global south. Moreover, even if they were sold in local markets, few subsistence-farming families could afford them. (And the planet can’t afford them, either. Environmentalists calculate that “disposable” diapers constitute the third-largest single consumer item in landfills, and their production requires some 7 billion gallons of oil each year.)

But availability and affordability tell only part of the story. The structure of labor plus deep-seated values also shape parents’ choices.

In Ivory Coast (as elsewhere across sub-Saharan Africa), Beng babies spend most of their days attached to someone’s back. Often, that someone is not the mother—who is working in her fields, producing crops to feed her large family. Beng society (unlike traditional Chinese society) also rates all feces (including those of babies) as disgusting, and the thought of a baby pooping on someone’s back produces revulsion.

Given the local attitude toward feces, no potential babysitter would take care of a child likely to poop on her back while being carried. Hence, starting potty training from birth aims to help a mother get her farm work done. In that sense, early toilet training promotes an adequate food supply for a mother’s family.

A Western observer might shrink in horror from this practice, imagining long-lasting emotional maladjustments from early trauma. But, discounting the ravages of poverty that challenge health and deny educational and economic opportunity, these very early toilet-trained babies appear to grow into just as happy and well-adjusted adults as diaper-wearing children might become.

Context counts for what works

In motivation, this practice may not even be as exotic as it might appear to a non-Beng reader. In the U.S., women’s labor needs may also dictate potty-training schedules, albeit with a later timeline. Many day care centers accept only children who are fully potty trained. If a working mother lacks both in-home day care options and babysitting relatives, she may work frantically to potty train her toddler as soon as possible, so she may return to full-time paid work.

For stay-at-home moms, or working moms who have nearby relatives to care for their child, different life situations may dictate toilet-training decisions. In the Palestinian territories, for instance, many women start toilet training around 14 or 15 months. They’re able to start early because they aren’t working outside the home, so they have the time. On the other hand, a Palestinian working woman may start toilet training later, maybe around age 2. In this case, women in the extended family (hamula) would care for the child while the mother worked, so no day care rule compels early toilet training.

Once we explore the local context of people’s daily lives, seemingly exotic or even abusive practices—split pants, infant enemas—suddenly seem far less so. Opening the minds of worried new parents to “other” ways of raising children may assuage fears that if they fail to “do the right thing,” their children will be doomed. Through exploring comparative commode customs, along with many other parenting practices, it’s clear there are many “right ways” to raise a child.

This work first appeared on SAPIENS under a CC BY-ND 4.0 license. Read the original here.

CALL FOR EDITED BOOK – Youth in Africa: Agents of Change

YOUTH IN AFRICA: AGENTS OF CHANGE 

Have you witnessed the power of youth as positive agents of change in Africa? Have you been part of a youth-led initiative or been working with young people to bring peace and prosperity to your community in Africa? Would you like to share your stories with a wide audience through a publication? If the answer to any of these questions is “Yes” this may be the opportunity you have been looking for to share about the great contributions that youth make to their communities.

What will the book be about? 

We aim to publish a book showing that youth not only represent a demographic issue, with its social, economic and political challenges, but also represent a positive force of change and an opportunity for Africa. Youth already engage in positive social change but their contributions are rarely documented and visible. The book aims to illustrate how youth are contributing to their societies by engaging in projects towards more democratic and fair societies.

The book will consist of 10 to 15 chapters organized in three parts:

1) Youth in Africa,

2) Youth in the African public political discourse, and,

3) Youth as agents of social change in Africa (selected case studies).

The book will be edited by Obi Peter and Celina Del Felice in English and Spanish, with the support of Casa Africa (www.casafrica.es, Spain) and published by Los Libros de la Catarata, Madrid, Spain (https://www.catarata.org/).

Why a book on this topic? 

Often, youth are perceived as victims or trouble-makers. This book aims to challenge and at the same time complete this picture by uncovering a reality that is often hidden. It aims to bring into focus young people who are positive agents of change. It will do so by describing examples in which young people, despite being victims in some cases, decide to engage in proactive and peaceful actions. There is a need to bring these stories to light.

Why should you apply to become a contributor? 

  • The opportunity to write about your own work or the work of other young people and inspire others in Africa and beyond.
  • To develop your writing and analytical skills in the topic by participating in an international group process of peer-to-peer learning. You will receive technical support and valuable feedback from editors and peers.
  • Networking and sharing of information with experts in the field.
  • Contributing to youth policy debates and support youth-led initiatives in Africa.

How to participate? 

To participate and be selected as a contributor, please send an expression of interest/motivation statement, a brief 1 or 2 page description of the chapter that you propose, along with your CV to [email protected] and [email protected] by 28 February 2018. [Apparently deadline has been extended to 15 March]

Your expression of interest and proposal shall detail the following:

  • Your personal motivation to this topic.
  • Indicate to which part of the book you want to contribute and briefly describe what the chapter will consist of. Parts of the book include:

1) Youth in Africa. 

This part aims to offer a definition of the concept of youth, its meanings in different contexts/regions of the continent and describe the social, economic, educational situation of youth. More conceptual and analytical chapters are welcome from sociological, economic, political, legal or anthropological perspectives.

2) Youth in the African public political discourse. 

This part aims to explain how the topic of “youth” has emerged in national and regional political discourses and (youth) policies. Chapters analysing particular countries or regional policies are welcome.

3) Youth as agents of social change in Africa. 

This part will consist of chapters describing and analysing cases of youth-led initiatives or organisations. Please, explain why you think the initiative you propose to describe makes a valuable contribution to peace and prosperity in Africa, if possible, indicate whether you have or could include testimonies and evidence of the social impact of the projects. Indicate the geographical location of the activities and the period in which these took place (for example, months/years)

  • Please be sure to also include in your proposal your full contact details (Your full name, country of origin and residence, gender, date of birth, e-mail, Skype id, telephone, full address, city and country).

Conditions 

  • Only one chapter will be allowed per author.
  • One contribution can be signed by several authors.
  • Chapters must be original and unpublished.
  • Chapters can be submitted in English, Spanish, French or Portuguese. Note that the publication will be in English and Spanish only.
  • Each chapter should be between 4000 and 6000 words, including bibliography and be submitted in word format.

Criteria for selecting authors 

  • Commitmentto write a full chapter, between 4.000 and 6.000 words by May 2018 in collaboration with the editors. Authors must be open to receive and take into consideration feedback for improvement.
  • Quality of the chapter proposal:Originality, clarity, robustness of the evidence supporting the arguments made and engagement with up-to-date or/and academic literature will be appreciated. We welcome chapters from any perspective or academic discipline (practitioner/youth worker/academic). In the case of a chapters for part 3 (Youth as agents of social change in Africa), you must explain clearly the reasons why you think the chosen youth-led initiative is worth-writing about, or in other words, why is it special in terms of its impact and its contribution to fairer and more peaceful communities.
  • Thematic balance. We aim to have different types of youth-led initiatives described working in different social issues (civic and peace education, social and political democratic participation, de-radicalisation and prevention of violent extremism, gender equality, youth empowerment, health, humanitarian and environmental projects)
  • Geographical representation. We aim to have case studies and insights from different regions of Africa in an attempt to illustrate the great diversity of the continent.
  • Gender balance. We aim to have gender balance of authors. Female authors are encouraged to apply.

What will happen if your proposal is selected? 

  • Selected contributors will be contacted on 9 March 2018.
  • Draft essays to be submitted by31 March 2018.
  • Feedback for improvement from editors sent by15 April 2018.
  • Final chapters to be submitted by30 May 2018. Note that if final chapters are not complete or submitted on time, they may not be included in this edition.

For more information, please, do not hesitate to contact us:

Celina Del Felice ([email protected]) Celina is an educator and researcher in the fields of conflict and peace studies youth work and peace education. She works for The Network University, the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya-UNITAR Master in Conflictology and the University for Peace. Celina is from Argentina, living in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain.

NEOS February 2018 Edition now available!

  • The February 2018 issue of Neos is now available for your reading pleasure at http://acyig.americananthro.org/neos/current-issue/.

    Some highlights:

    • Methods and Ethics regarding mobile cultures
      (Pauline A. Duncan (U Edinburgh) and Maureen Fin (U Edinburgh))
    • Childhood, Play, and Funds of Knowledge in the Classroom (Tori K. Flint (U Louisiana, Lafayette))
    • Childhood and Restorative Justice in the United States (Amanda J. Reinke (Georgia College))
    • Childhood and Empathic Aid: Educating Others about Child Suffering (Sara E. Lahti Thiam (Case Western Reserve U))
    • New board member introductions
    • NEW BOOK AND FILM ANNOUNCEMENTS Let us know what you think! Share your reactions in a Letter to the Editor at [email protected].

     

Extended – AMECYS Call for Papers: Graduate Student Paper Prize

Submissions Deadline Extended:  Thursday, April 15, 2018

The Association of Middle East Children’s and Youth Studies (AMECYS) calls graduate students engaged in the study of children and youth in the region (and diasporic communities) to submit their papers to the AMECYS graduate student paper prize.  A cash prize of $100 will be awarded to the winner at the Middle East Studies Association (MESA) of North America’s annual meeting in San Antonio, Texas, November 15-18, 2018.

Papers can be submitted in any capacity that aligns with AMECYS’ mission statement:

The AMECYS is a private, non-profit, international association for scholars with an interest in the study of children and youth in the Middle East, North Africa and their diasporic communities. Through interdisciplinary programs, publications, and services, AMECYS promotes innovative scholarship, facilitates global academic exchange, and enhances public understanding about Middle Eastern children and youth in diverse times and places. 

Requirements for submission:

–       Papers should not exceed 7,500 (excluding bibliographies and endnotes)

–       The paper should never have been submitted for publication

–       The format needs to include: Standard font, Double-spaced, 1” margins, IJMES standards for endnotes and transliteration

–       Member of AMECYS in good-standing

–       Proof of registered graduate student enrollment for the 2018-2019 academic year may be requested at a later date

Send submissions as a pdf or word doc to [email protected] and [email protected] .

The AMECYS graduate student representative, program chair and appointed committee will review all papers submitted by members of AMECYS that are received by the deadline of Thursday, April 15.

For queries, email AMECYS program chair at [email protected]

Theorising young people’s aspirations in a global context: an interdisciplinary conference

Taking place  on Monday 26th and Tuesday 27th March 2018 in the Hamilton Centre, Brunel University London

This interdisciplinary 2 day conference aims to advance conceptual understanding of how young people form, experience and deploy aspiration; the global institutions and processes that shape young people’s aspirations; and the outcomes of aspiration for young people and for wider society. Recent empirical research from diverse contexts worldwide has reported on the expressed desires of young people to ‘become someone’. Meanwhile, global institutions and national governments represent aspiration as a key to understanding inequality and a motivating force that can inspire social change. Aspiration is understood to play a key role in shaping young people’s engagement with education, politics and migration. Yet despite the burgeoning attention to aspiration in both research and policy, its theorisation remains relatively neglected.

Key note speakers

Professor Jo Boyden, University of Oxford

Professor Sam Punch, University of Stirling

A full programme will be sent to attendees before the conference takes place. In the meantime registration has opened and you can sign up here: Theorising-aspirations

The price of tickets are as follows; £30 for unwaged attendee ,

£50 for waged attendees

For further information please contact  [email protected]

New Documentary “Daughters of the Forest”

Distributed by Bullfrog Films

DAUGHTERS OF THE FOREST tells the uplifting story of a small group of girls in one of the most remote forests left on earth who attend a radical high school where they learn to protect the threatened forest and forge a better future for themselves.

Set in the Mbaracayú Reserve in rural Paraguay, this documentary offers a glimpse into the Mbaracayú Forest Girls’ School, a place where 150 girls are becoming some of the most financially literate young people in South America – not just because they learn economics along with all of the other traditional subjects, but because they are putting what they learn into practice.

Filmed over the course of five years, we follow the girls from their homes in indigenous villages through the year after their graduation.

Bullfrog Films’s catalog page: http://www.bullfrogfilms.com/catalog/dotf.html

CFP: Children, Youth, and Performance Conference: Connecting Drama and Performance Research to Practice in the Lives of Young People

Toronto, June 24th, 2018. Proposal deadline February 9th, 2018.

Building on the Ada Slaight Education Centre’s strong focus on Theatre for Young Audiences and Drama-in-Education, the ‘Children, Youth, and Performance Conference’ will bring together scholars, performers, and practitioners from different areas of the world. This conference is intended to be an exchange of knowledge, research innovations, and practical methods, examining the future applications and implications of performance work with, by, for, and about children and youth. This peer-reviewed conference will put performance research to work and discuss its effects on the lives of young people.

Proposals

We welcome proposals based on cutting-edge research, theories, and practices which focus on any of these five streams:

1. Drama, Justice, and Advocacy

2. Theatre by and for Young People

3. Global Perspectives on Children, Youth, and Performance

4. New Directions for Drama-in-Education

5. Youth Performance Across Disciplines

Each proposal should outline the presentation’s purpose, method, findings (for case studies and panels), and what will take place during the session. Please clearly indicate which conference stream your proposal best fits into, and which of the following formats your presentation will take:

Case Studies (15 minutes): These presentations should discuss case studies and projects relevant to one of the above conference themes. We welcome interactive, innovative presentation approaches, veering away from traditional ‘lecture-style’ paper presentations.

‘On-Your-Feet’ Workshops (45 minutes): Workshops should be directly relevant to one of the conference themes, and welcoming to participants with varying levels of performance or research experience. Please ensure your workshop carefully adheres to the allotted timeframe (including all required set-up and/or take-down), as sessions will be back-to-back. Workshop presenters are responsible for their own materials and set-up. Please clearly indicate space needs (empty room, chairs, tables, etc.), and the specific activities that will take place.

Panels (30 minutes): We welcome panel proposals of three to five participants, showcasing initiatives and projects relevant to one of the above conference streams. Panels may include any combination of researchers, practitioners, performers, and/or young people, in a collaborative, discussion-style format.

Original Performance Pieces (up to 15 minutes): All proposed performances must fit within the allotted timeframe (including all required set-up and/or take-down). These pieces or excerpts should be original works created with, by, for, or about children and/or youth. Performances should be flexible for a variety of potential spaces (such as a classroom or studio) and should indicate specific resource needs (chairs, tables, etc.).

Your proposal should be no longer than one page, clearly stating the presentation title (20 words max.), presenter name(s) and bio(s) (100 words max.), the appropriate conference stream, the presentation format (workshop, panel etc.), and summary (250 words max.). Proposals must be sent directly to Abigail Shabtay, Conference Chair at [email protected]youngpeoplestheatre.ca no later than February 9th, 2018 at 4pm EST. Inquiries about facilities/accessibility can be directed to Karen Gilodo, Associate Artistic Director, at [email protected]. Accepted presenters must register and confirm attendance by the registration deadline to be included in the program schedule (registration details will follow letters of acceptance).

Responsibility and Adventure: Tongan Youth and Circular Migration

By Mary K. Good, Wake Forest University 
(Originally posted on January 2018: reposted here with permission from Youth Circulations)

Following the politically-driven riots in 2006, where looting and destruction of property was largely blamed on wayward youth, the nation of Tonga began to critically examine the emergent issue of youth unemployment and under-employment. The Tonga National Youth Congress and Tonga’s Ministry of Internal Affairs Division of Training, Employment, Youth, and Sports, along with several transnational non-governmental organizations and foreign government aid organizations, rolled out a variety of programs aimed at developing youth skills and offering pathways to employment. However, with about 60% of the population under the age of 25 (Tonga Census 2011), the numbers of youth seeking employment still outnumber available jobs, particularly on outer islands where fewer wage-earning opportunities exist. Thus, many youth and their families consider immigration to find work. Income from a temporary job overseas can sometimes exceed an entire year’s salary in Tonga. This economic incentive, coupled with a deeply engrained sense of moral responsibility to help one’s family and the prospect of an exciting adventure in the company of friends, leads many youth into circular migration—a pattern of movement that has become emblematic of life in parts of Tonga.

…read more on youthcirculations.com