Category Archives: Calls for Papers: Publishing

CFP – Special Issue of *Jeunesse* on Consumption

Call for Papers
Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures

Special Issue on Consumption

Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures invites essay submissions for a special issue addressing the many interpretations of consumption and their meanings in relation to youth texts and culture(s). We welcome essays that consider registers of race, class, gender, and disability. Essays should be between 6,000 and 9,000 words in length and prepared for blind peer-review.

Consumption is a vehicle through which we come to understand proprietary relationships with people, places, bodies, and identities. If food is the primary signifier when we think of consumption, how might we read metaphoric consumption (of capital, culture, and place, for instance) in light of notions of necessity and survival?

Submissions of articles, which should include abstracts, are requested by: 15 December 2013.

Topics may include:

– representations of food or the ingestion of food and drink
– eating disorders, the stigma of obesity, and fatphobia
– pedagogy of health
– consumption as disease (ie. tuberculosis)
– obsession or fixation
– symbolic acts of devouring/being devoured
– cannibalism or consuming the self (eg. vampires, fairy tales)
– consumption, purchasing, ownership, and material culture
– discourses of consumption (good/bad consumers)
– young people as consumers, advertising for or about young people
– cultural consumerism/tourism

Inquiries may be directed to Larissa Wodtke, Managing Editor:
[email protected]

Further information about submission guidelines is available at:
http://jeunessejournal.ca

To download a PDF of the CFP:
http://crytc.uwinnipeg.ca/pdf/Jeunesse_Special_Issue_Consumption_CFP.pdf

CFP: Representations of Childhood in Comics

Childhood is now widely recognized as a social construct (Fass, Jenks, Mintz). As the artifice behind the construction of childhood has been revealed, there has been a marked increase in the analysis of children and childhood in contemporary culture (Demarr and Bakermann, Edelman, Latham, McLennan, Renner, Stockton). Despite the increase in scholarly attention, depictions of childhood in comics and other forms of comic art are ripe for further study. The forthcoming issue of the Journal of Graphic Novels and Comics, focusing on comics, picturebooks, and childhood, should provide interesting insights into these depictions. Yet there remains plenty of room for consideration regarding how different comics construct childhood. This is an especially interesting area of inquiry given the somewhat vexed association comic books have traditionally maintained with childhood. In an attempt to continue developing the scholarly focus on childhood, as well as comics, we seek proposals for scholarly articles that analyze, explore and interrogate depictions of childhood in comics or comic art for inclusion in a book-length anthology.

We welcome all proposals, although, based on responses so far, we are particularly interested in more submissions regarding depictions of childhood in comics aimed at adults.

Potential topics include:

What do comics teach us about current constructions of childhood?

How do comics resist or undermine contemporary constructions of childhood?

How can comics help us better understand the role of children in a given societal context?

How do comics shed light on the relationship between children and adults? Between adults and their own childhood?

How can depictions of childhood be understood as metaphors for specific cultural phenomena, values, disruptions or evolutions?

What anxieties regarding culture, politics, education, etc. do comics reveal?

How have ideas regarding childhood affected comics?

Please submit an abstract of 300 words and a short CV to Mark Heimermann, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and Brittany Tullis, St. Ambrose University, at [email protected] by January 1st, 2014 for consideration. Full papers will be due by June 1st, 2014.

CFP – Special Issue: Global Childhood Studies

Bridging the divide: Researching Children/ Young People and Sexuality 

Guest Editors
Nelly Ali (Birkbeck)
Joe Hall (University of Hull)

After a great success of our paper and panel sessions at the RGS Annual
Conference, we are very pleased to share that we have secured a special
edition volume of the peer reviewed journal Global Childhood Studies.

The sub-fields of children’s and youth geographies and geographies of
sexualities often deal with intersecting themes that cross-cut the
(seemingly) mutually exclusive nature of these fields. In our proposed
sessions we aim to bring these themes to the forefront and bridge the divide
between these geographical sub-fields by prompting a stimulating discussion
between children’s and youth geographers (and scholars of childhood and
youth more broadly) and researchers of sexuality. We hope this long overdue
interaction will kick start a rich and rewarding dialogue that may continue
for years to
come.

We are seeking abstracts for a methodologically focused collected edition
that we hope will address the practical aspects of conducting research with
children/ young people around issues of sexuality. This may include papers
given by early career researchers who have, or are about to explore a topic
of sexuality with children/ young people in contrasting socio-cultural
contexts. It may also include papers by experienced researchers who may be
able to offer insight and practical advice for conducting ethically sound
research with various types of children/ young people. We also welcome
papers that explore innovative approaches to data collection and analysis.

Please submit proposed titles and abstracts of no more than 500 words to
Nelly Ali ([email protected]) and Joe Hall ([email protected]) by
29th December 2013.

Schedule:

Abstracts in: 29th December 2013
Acceptance communicated 15th January 2014
First Draft of Papers: 15th March 2014
Reviews Complete 15th May 2014
Modifications: 30th June 2014
Checks and Editorial: 1st August 2014
Final Version ready for submission 15th September 2014

Publish your work in Anthropology and Education Quarterly!

Anthropology and Education Quarterly

General Call for Papers

Anthropology & Education Quarterly is a peer-reviewed journal, housed at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. It draws on anthropological theories and methods to examine educational processes in and out of schools, in US and international contexts. Articles rely primarily on ethnographic research to address immediate problems of practice as well as broad theoretical questions surrounding issues that impact research and practice in the field. We value diverse ways of knowing and weaving together theory, research, practice, and social justice to directly address issues and institutions that impact teaching and learning in the educational experiences of children, families, and communities within and beyond the classroom setting. We also see the journal as a key site for providing connection, support and feedback to emerging scholars in the field. Finally, to all of this we must reaffirm the journal’s long tradition of supporting anti-oppressive, socially equitable, and racially, socially and gender-just education.

The journal publishes two different types of scholarly work, manuscripts and reflections. (1) Manuscripts should be no more than 35 pages in length. (2) Reflections from/on the Field should be approximately 15-20 pages in length. Both should be formatted as Word documents and blinded for anonymous peer review.

We are eager to receive your manuscript submissions.

For more information visit us at:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1548-1492

You may also contact the Editors-in-Chief, Dr. Laura Alicia Valdiviezo and Dr. Sally Campbell Galman at [email protected]

CFP: Seeking One Additional Essay for Collection: “The War of My Generation:” Youth Culture and the War on Terror

I am seeking an additional essay to complete a collection of essays under contract with Rutgers University Press entitled _”The War of My Generation:” Youth Culture and the War on Terror_. This collection examines how children and adolescents have been imagined as subjects in the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks and during the subsequent war on terror in its domestic and foreign policy manifestations. Essays already accepted examine cultural products aimed at young people (video games, novels, children’s books) and how young people have been imagined as subjects (students who should/shouldn’t encounter specific images of the war, potential military recruits, etc.). Other essays explore how young people have responded to the attacks and wars.

In response to a suggestion by an external reviewer, I am seeking an additional essay that explores young people’s engagement in acts of memorialization and/or protest. I am interested in essays that address one or more of the following questions, though I’m of course open to other approaches as well:

-How have young people engaged in the memorialization of the September 11 attacks or the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars? What do their actions at memorial sites, their participation in memorial ceremonies, or their creation of new ways/sites of remembering tell us about how young people engage with the critical questions of citizenship during the War on Terror?

-How have young people supported or protested the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan? What do their actions tell us about how young people imagine the role of the United States in the world, the place of the military in society, and the obligations of citizenship during the War on Terror?

-How do young people’s acts of memorialization and protest draw upon/intersect with/revise earlier protest traditions — anti-Vietnam protests, sit-ins, and teach-ins, divestment movements, and so on?

Essays should be no longer than 9.000 words, and I would like to submit the final draft of the collection to the press in January.

Please feel free to contact me to discuss ideas.

Thanks.

Dave Kieran
American Studies
Franklin & Marshall College
David Kieran
American Studies Department
Franklin & Marshall College
P.O. Box 3003
Lancaster, PA 17603
Email: [email protected]

CFP: Wheelock International Journal of Children, Families, and Social Change

Inaugural Issue: Call for Papers

Wheelock International Journal of Children, Families, and Social Change
The Wheelock International Journal of Children, Families, and Social Change
(http://journal.wheelock.edu) is an online, open-access, interdisciplinary
forum for substantive conversations about understanding and improving the
lives of children and families throughout the world. Our scope is unique and
broad: peer-reviewed scholarly articles as well as essays by policy makers,
advocates, educators, NGOs, and practitioners. We seek contributions that
infuse intellectual rigor with moral and social purpose, and offer action
strategies to address old problems and new opportunities. We aim for a broad
and inclusive readership. Our goal: to enhance understanding and to foster
change and progress.

The journal is currently accepting manuscripts for our inaugural issue from
both established and emergent scholars and leaders. We publish a range of
contributions, including case-studies, comparative analyses, advocacy, and
policy articles. All submissions are carefully reviewed by relevant scholars
and leaders in the field to maintain the highest standards of rigor and
insight. Submissions to the Research & Scholarship section will be
double-blind, peer-reviewed. We also welcome submissions from outside
academia.

Relevant topics include education and schools, parenting and childrearing,
globalization, gender, new pedagogies, work, service learning, art and
music, violence, urbanism, health, media, technology, and more. We ask
authors to formulate perspectives that are cutting-edge, and to write for a
wide readership that expands beyond the traditional confines of any single
discipline. We invite submissions that learn from the past, explore the
present, and look ahead to a bright future. We welcome authors from a
variety of disciplines: history, education, women’s studies, literature,
psychology, feminism, family studies, religion, childhood studies,
anthropology, sociology, social work, critical theory, political science,
and development studies. The journal seeks to build intellectual bridges
between scholarly disciplines and to bring together theory and practice,
scholarship and activism, the academy and the “real world,” developed and
developing nations. Our scope is global in foc
us and outreach.  We offer the journal at no charge to readers and eagerly
invite contributions from thought leaders around the world.

For further information, submission guidelines, the Editorial Board, and to
sign up for updates, please visit our website: http://journal.wheelock.edu.
You are also welcome to contact the Editor (Eric Silverman) at
[email protected].

The Wheelock International Journal of Children, Families, and Social Change,
like our institutional host Wheelock College, is committed to creating a
just world for children and families.  Join us in this important work.

CFP: Generations and Protests: Legacies, Emergences in the MENA region and the Mediterranean

Call for Papers

Generations and Protests: Legacies, Emergences in the MENA region and the Mediterranean

The recent events in the Middle East, North Africa and elsewhere in the world brought forth the question of youth engagement and the development of new forms of protest. While much have been discussed, the demonstration of the interconnectedness between different protest “moments” in the long term or on a diachronic axis remains extremely thin if not absent. The aim of this collection is to inquire and problematize the relations that exist between different periods of protest, the type of actors they mobilize and the processes of memory they generate.

The articles of this collection will deal with these questions and others in

1. Referring to specific national contexts and narratives.
2. Reconsidering the limits of the present and reassessing the past in youth formations.
3. Analyzing the dynamic between generations and memory formations. 4. Examining the function of media technologies and modes and modalities of communication.
5. Exploring the productions of subjectivities in examining the types of counter-publics produced by different generations.
6. Identifying the correspondences and the complexities between contexts and temporalities.
7. Problematizing place and space and the conditions of emergence of protest mobilizations and contestation.
8. Developing new methodologies and approaches to youth/generation clusters in the MENA and the Mediterranean.
9. Exploring the limits of the concept of generation, particularly the ways in which certain groups framed their struggle as first and foremost between freedom vs. oppression, democracy vs. Totalitarianism, or New Regime vs. Old Regime.

Please send an abstract (minimum 450 words and not to exceed 550 words), a short biography (highlighting research and publications), and contact information by November 4, 2013 to professors Mark Ayyash and Ratiba Hadj-Moussa ([email protected] ; [email protected]).

Notifications of acceptance will be sent by November 20, 2013.

Article submission deadline is May 22, 2014.

CFP: New, open source journal

Announcement
Inaugural Issue: Call for Papers
Wheelock International Journal of Children, Families, and Social Change

The Wheelock International Journal of Children, Families, and Social Change (http://journal.wheelock.edu ) is an online, open-access, interdisciplinary forum for substantive conversations about understanding and improving the lives of children and families throughout the world. Our scope is unique and broad: peer-reviewed scholarly articles as well as essays by policy makers, advocates, educators, NGOs, and practitioners. We seek contributions that infuse intellectual rigor with moral and social purpose, and offer action strategies to address old problems and new opportunities. We aim for a broad and inclusive readership. Our goal: to enhance understanding and to foster change and progress.

The journal is currently accepting manuscripts for our inaugural issue from both established and emergent scholars and leaders. We publish a range of contributions, including case-studies, comparative analyses, advocacy, and policy articles. All submissions are carefully reviewed by relevant scholars and leaders in the field to maintain the highest standards of rigor and insight. Submissions to the Research & Scholarship section will be double-blind, peer-reviewed. We also welcome submissions from outside academia.
Relevant topics include education and schools, parenting and childrearing, globalization, gender, new pedagogies, work, service learning, art and music, violence, urbanism, health, media, technology, and more. We ask authors to formulate perspectives that are cutting-edge, and to write for a wide readership that expands beyond the traditional confines of any single discipline. We invite submissions that learn from the past, explore the present, and look ahead to a bright future. We welcome authors from a variety of disciplines: history, education, women’s studies, literature, psychology, feminism, family studies, religion, childhood studies, anthropology, sociology, social work, critical theory, political science, and development studies. The journal seeks to build intellectual bridges between scholarly disciplines and to bring together theory and practice, scholarship and activism, the academy and the “real world,” developed and developing nations. Our scope is global in focus and outreach.  We offer the journal at no charge to readers and eagerly invite contributions from thought leaders around the world.

For further information, submission guidelines, the Editorial Board, and to sign up for updates, please visit our website: http://journal.wheelock.edu . You are also welcome to contact the Editor (Eric Silverman) a t[email protected].

The Wheelock International Journal of Children, Families, and Social Change, like our institutional host Wheelock College, is committed to creating a just world for children and families.  Join us in this important work.