Category Archives: Calls for Papers: Conferences

CFP ‘Children’s Labour and Schooling: Ideologies, Histories, Everyday Lives’ workshop, Delhi, Dec 13-14, 2013

Call for Papers

Children’s Labour and Schooling: Ideologies, Histories, Everyday Lives
December 13-14, 2013
Centre for the Study of Developing Societies (CSDS), Delhi, India

The proposed workshop is an effort to bring together a range of scholars to
explore the interface of childrens work and schooling from the nineteenth
century onwards. Quite unlike earlier local, and less publicized attempts to
end children’s labour through schooling in India, the Right to Education Act
(2009) is being viewed as a historic opportunity to finally realize this
crucial milestone. Current discussions on this Right are dominated by
concerns relating to school access and quality. Though important, these
discussions leave little room to explore the complex intersections between
child labor and schooling in colonial and postcolonial India: intersections
that draw attention to issues not necessarily exhausted by ensuring school
access for laboring children. This complicated past of less than ideal
resolutions produced by a modern apparatus of schooling/training set in
place by the colonial and postcolonial state, points to the need to open-up
and rethink the binary framing of labor vs school which tends to limit
contemporary discussions.

Of central consideration is how the categories child, labor and school have
been variously deployed in colonial and postcolonial India to reject,
instrumentally accommodate and /or defer schooling for child laborers, and
the continuing effects of these deployments in the present. Topics broadly
include:

*   the shifting production of parental preference around childrens futures;
*   missionary efforts that combined literary and technical education;
*   the emergence of secular notions of age, delinquency and labor
legislation in determining the child figure;
*   the specific histories of caste associations, occupational mobility and
shifting aspirations;
*   the pedagogic regulation of imagined futures through modern sites and
techniques of instruction like factory schools, industrial schools,
half-time schools, object-lessons etc.;
*   Nai Talims singular assertions around work and learning; national,
transnational and global anxieties around development and its foregrounding
the child;
*   India’s demographic dividend and new assertions around skills;
sites in contemporary India where children are engaged in labor, and combine
work with schooling;
*   linkages between childrens labor, migration, formal and informal
arrangements of apprenticeship and Indias growing informal economy.

The workshop also welcomes intellectually creative, non-disciplinary
reflections on the issue of Dalit and other marginalised communities
experience of schooling and work. Autobiographies, poetry and childrens
stories have emerged as significant genres to imaginatively explore the
complex, everyday circulation and experience of existing hierarchies between
those who work with their hands and those who work with their heads. These
writings compel social scientists to re-examine the ways in which we
currently employ concepts like labor, learning, mental, manual, and the
workshop welcomes these contributions.

Interested participants should send an abstract of not more than 400 words
to Sarada Balagopalan ([email protected]) by October 15, 2013. Please specify
Childrens Work and Schooling Workshop under the subject heading.

CFP: Children and Globalization

Call for Papers
The 10th Joint Area Centers Symposium
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
April 10-12, 2014

Children and Globalization: Issues, Policies and Initiatives

Keynote SpeakerDavid Oswell, Department of Sociology, University of London

“After Our Children’s Image: Human Rights, Capital and the Common”


Papers are solicited for the following panels:

1.     Cross-cultural and historical perspectives on childhood and children

2.     Children and migration

3.     Child labor

4.     International adoption

5.     Homeless/street children

6.     Children and sexuality: child marriages, sexual abuse, sex slavery

7. Children and war: victims, refugees, child soldiers; children and peacebuilding/conflict resolution

8.     Children’s rights

To submit a proposal, send the following to Valerie Hoffman ([email protected] <mailto:[email protected]> ), Director of the Center for South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, by September 23, 2013:


–         a paper title and an abstract of approximately 250-300 words

–         an indication of the panel on which your paper would best fit

–         on a separate sheet of paper, provide a brief biography, with your name, institutional affiliation, position or title, and a short statement of your interests

The hotel accommodation and meals of accepted presenters will be paid for by the conference.
Joint Area Centers Symposia at the University of Illinois are sponsored by: the Center for South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies; the Center for African Studies; the Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies; the European Union Center; the Center for Global Studies; the Center for International Business Education and Research; the International Forum on U.S. Studies; the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, the Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies, the Russian, East European and Eurasian Center, and the Program in Women and Gender in Global Perspectives.

CFP – Panel: “25 Years of Children’s Rights in Africa”

Please find below a symposium abstract submitted by myself and Dr. Samuel Okyere (University of Nottingham) to the organising committee for next year’s ASAUK conference in Sussex (Sept. 2014).

We are now inviting people to submit abstracts for individual papers to this panel. This must be done through the ASAUK website:http://www.asauk.net/conferences/asauk14.shtml

If this is not applicable to you I would appreciate it if you could forward this to any of your contacts who may be interested in this call.

Below is our panel abstract:

25 Years of Children’s Rights in Africa:
Assessing the Impact of the CRC and the ACRWC

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child (ACRWC) will both be celebrating their 25th anniversaries in November 2014 and July 2015 respectively. The CRC was hailed as a significant milestone in the promotion of children’s rights at the global level, just as the ACRWC was also lauded for its ambition to offer correctives and fill any gaps left by the CRC with respect to the rights of African children. The CRC in particular has made notable progress in informing amendments to constitutions as well as leading to the introduction of children’s rights acts into the legislative framework of a significant number of countries in Africa and elsewhere. Yet, expectations that the CRC and ACRWC would have a positive and significant impact on the lives of African children have not necessarily been realised. Overall, progress of the two international treaties has been constrained by a number of factors. Most notably, the CRC stands accused of attempting to impose Western ideals on African societies, while the ACRWC has paradoxically witnessed poor ratification by African countries including some which were involved in its formulation.

As both international treaties approach their 25th anniversaries, the panel aims to take stock of their progress and the impact they have had on the lived experiences of children in various social, cultural, economic and political contexts across sub-Saharan Africa. Papers adopting sociological, anthropological and social policy perspectives will be particularly welcomed.

Best Wishes,

Afua


Dr. Afua Twum-Danso Imoh
Lecturer in the Sociology of Childhood/Editor of Childhoods Today

Department of Sociological Studies,
The University of Sheffield,
Elmfield,
Northumberland Road,
Sheffield,
S10 2TU,
UK
Tel: (+ 44 114 22) 26444
Fax : (+ 44 114) 2768125
Email: [email protected]